University

General Education Subjects

These subjects allow you to acquire knowledge of the basics and of relevant domains needed to advance your specialized studies. Choose from a wide range of choices regardless of your department or major.

Foundations for Learning

Basic University Seminar I/II, Basic Document Preparation, Essay Writing Methods, Japanese Business Etiquette and Documents, etc.

Mind and Thought

Practical Buddhism, Introduction to Prince Shotoku, Psychology I/II, Introduction to Philosophy, Introduction to Contemporary Philosophy, etc.

Society and Culture

Modern Society and Buddhism, Constitution of Japan, Introduction to Law, Political Science, Modern Japanese Culture and Society, etc.

Information and Natural Science

Information Processing I/II, Programming, Information Systems, Data Collection and Analysis, Life Sciences, Environmental Science, etc.

Health and Welfare

Sports I/II, Introduction to Social Welfare, Social Welfare Administration, Welfare for the Aged, Welfare for the Disabled, etc.

Languages

English I–IV, Advanced English I/II, German I–IV, French I–IV, Chinese I–IV, Korean I/II, etc.

Career Education

Career Design I/II, Mathematics I/II, Basic Literary Expression, Introduction to Regional Revitalization, etc.

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences Department of Japanese Studies
Department of Global Studies
Department of Sociology
Major in Health and Social Welfare, Department of Human Welfare
Faculty of Education Department of Education

Elementary School Education Course

Early Childhood Education Course

Junior or Senior High School English Education Course

Health Education Course

Faculty of Business Administration Department of Business Administration

Major in Public Management

Major in Corporate Management

Faculty of Nursing Department of Nursing

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department of Japanese Studies

Fields of Study

Japanese Language and Literature

History, Culture, Tourism

Contemporary Culture

Diploma Policy

The goals of this department are to help students systematically acquire a wide range of knowledge by studying Japan’s language, literature, history, and culture with a global perspective, identify problems and challenges, acquire the means and decision-making abilities to take on these challenges, master a high level of communicative abilities in Japanese, and live in harmony with others. With this in mind, students should have acquired the following four types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) A wide range of knowledge and education related to Japan and its language
    Students will have an understanding of the fundamentals, gained by systematically acquiring a wide range of knowledge through the study of Japan’s language, literature, history, and culture with a global perspective.
  • (2) The ability to express Japanese in a sophisticated, accurate manner
    Students will have acquired the methods and abilities to express Japanese precisely and appropriately, and can use these in a manner appropriate to the situation, so that they can convey thoughts and opinions effortlessly to others.
  • (3) Well-rounded, logical thinking and analytical capacities, and the ability to discover and solve problems
    Students will take a comprehensive perspective in the areas of language, literature, history, and culture, analyze matters by using logical thinking of problems in fields of specialty, and strive to solve problems and challenges that they discover on their own.
  • (4) Understanding of one’s self and others, and cultivation of a rich human quality
    Students will have a deeper understanding of themselves and others through the understanding and inquiry into issues in their studies, and aim to live in harmony with others by cultivating rich human qualities.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The philosophy behind the curriculum in the Department of Japanese Studies is to get students away from a rigid focus on only certain disciplines and allow them to choose the subjects they wish from groups of subjects based on their interests and career goals. This is so that they can enjoy a wide range of learning. To this end, the curriculum is organized into three areas of discipline: ① Language and Literature, ② History, Culture, and Tourism, and ③ Contemporary Culture. Furthermore, the general disciplines allow students to acquire fundamental knowledge and skills and deepen specialized knowledge through seminars. They also provide a course where students can acquire certification to become a museum curator.

  • (1) In the general disciplines, students take seminar subjects that progressively build on each other and on other subjects. In the progressive seminars, there are classes in which students acquire fundamental knowledge and skills, and classes in which they deepen their specialized knowledge. The other subjects impart the fundamentals and skills related to areas such as Japanese classics and calligraphy.
  • (2) Discipline ①, Language and Literature, is divided into the sub-disciplines of the Japanese language and Japanese literature. In Japanese language, there are classes in the system and history of Japanese, and in Japanese education. In Japanese literature, there are classes in ancient, modern, and contemporary literature, and in Chinese classics. Both sub-disciplines have an abundance of classes geared to helping students acquire a teaching license in Japanese for junior and senior high school, while the Japanese literature sub-discipline has classes useful for lesson practice in Japanese for junior and senior high school.
  • (3) Discipline ②, History, Culture, and Tourism, is divided into the three sub-disciplines of history, culture, and tourism. The history sub-discipline has classes covering periods from the ancient to modern; the culture sub-discipline has classes in which students can consider a variety of historical approaches to Japanese culture; and the tourism sub-discipline has a wide range of classes from geography to the practical side of travel. All three sub-disciplines have an abundance of the department’s introductory subjects for acquiring a social studies teacher’s license, and a license to teach geography and history in high school.
  • (4) Discipline ③, Contemporary Culture, has classes covering a wide range of contemporary cultural phenomena, from literature, music, films, and art, to subculture. There are also classes that analyze the state of contemporary media, including the internet, social networks, and media mix (media franchise).
  • (5) In the museum curator course, classes are arranged systematically, and these include everything from overview subjects to practicums in museum management. These allow students to acquire the knowledge for carrying out the range of work that must be done at today’s museums.
Education Method
  • (1) So that students can acquire a wide range of knowledge and education related to Japan and its language, overview lectures are provided in the three disciplines in the first and second year.
  • (2) So that students acquire the ability to communicate in a sophisticated, accurate manner in Japanese, lessons that improve Japanese communication skills are provided in the first and second year. There are also plentiful opportunities for students to give presentations in the spirit of active learning.
  • (3) In the third and fourth years, through mainly specialized seminars, students have opportunities to present the results of their studies as they employ logical thinking on a range of topics in their discipline of specialty. This fosters their ability for autonomous discovery and the solving of problems.
  • (4) In an education environment conducive to improvement by all participants, classes incorporate two-way critiques for students and include rubric evaluation and other clearly standardized methods to help students foster an understanding of themselves and others.
  • (5) In specialized seminars and teacher-training classes, the Japanese teacher program, and the museum curator course, students do frequent field work and study visits, which provide them with opportunities to learn through first-hand experience.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) In lecture subjects, students undergo a multifaceted evaluation of their learning success, being marked by their instructors primarily on periodic tests but also on short mid-term tests, reports, and essays.
  • (2) In seminar subjects, students are given a comprehensive evaluation on their many activities: presentations in which they use information and communication technology (ICT) to clearly convey messages; discussions on these presentations in which students critique one another; group work that uses worksheets; and reports in which they compile what they have learned.
  • (3) In teacher-training classes and the Japanese teacher program, students are evaluated through tests and other means to determine how well they have acquired specialized knowledge. They are also evaluated when they give mock lessons, which show how well they can apply their specialized knowledge.
Admission Policy

The Department of Japanese Studies admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who are deeply interested in Japanese in the curriculum for junior and senior high school—or in Calligraphy, Geography, History, and other similar subjects in the curriculum for senior high school—and who hope to acquire abilities to share information using their knowledge of Japan and Japanese-language expression.
  • 2) Those who are willing to proactively tackle issues using their understanding of the disposition, sensibilities, and thinking of the Japanese people as gained through learning and analyzing a wide range of knowledge on Japanese culture, and who have the ability to appreciate Japanese culture and other cultures.
  • 3) Those who aim to be a Japanese teacher at a junior or senior high school or a calligraphy teacher at a senior high school, those who aim to teach Japanese as a second language, or those who aim to obtain the qualification of curator and find employment in that field.
  • 4) Those who aim to find a job at a business enterprise in a field such as tourism, culture, education, publication, or advertising and who aim to actively use their broad knowledge of Japan and Japanese-language expression.

Department of Global Studies

Fields of Study

Global Business

International Understanding and Cooperation

English and English Education

Diploma Policy

In the Department of Global Studies, the goal is to turn out people who can play an active role in a globalizing world. To this end, students acquire practical foreign language abilities and communication skills, fundamental knowledge on changing international issues, and the knowledge and skills needed to plan a career after graduation.
With this in mind, students should have acquired the following five types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Foreign language ability
    Students will have acquired practical foreign language skills in the four areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  • (2) Communication ability
    Students can use their high level of foreign language ability to communicate promptly in response to issues in today’s globalizing world.
  • (3) International knowledge
    Students will have acquired the ability to fully understand international issues such as the environment, ethnic conflicts, religion, economics, and finance, and can play a practical role for Japan in an international world.
  • (4) Understanding of other cultures
    Students are interested in the history, culture, politics, economics, and other factors behind language, and have garnered an interest and enthusiasm for other cultures.
  • (5) Problem-solving ability
    Students will have acquired the necessary knowledge and skills to become valuable members of global society through their ability to set problem-solving goals and work with others to achieve these.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The philosophy behind the curriculum in the Department of Global Studies is to allow students to systematically and practically gain the abilities, knowledge, and skills for dealing with today’s globalized society. In the first and second years, emphasis is on improving foreign language ability. In the third and fourth years, students, depending on their desired path and aptitude, choose designated subjects in the four disciplines of ① English Culture and Communication, ② International Understanding, ③ Career Support, and ④ Teacher Development. Also, in the third and fourth years, students take specialized seminars depending on their aptitude and interests, and under the guidance of their supervising teacher carry out a graduation research project.

  • (1) In the first year, students are required to take English Grammar I/II, Beginning Extensive Reading I/II, Basic Communication I/II/III/IV, and Introduction to Career English I. In the required subject of International Relations, they learn the basics of understanding international issues.
  • (2) In the second year, students are required to take Intermediate Extensive Reading I/II, and Basic Communication V/VI/VII/VIII. In the general discipline subjects, starting in their third year students select subjects they are interested in from four disciplines: ① English Culture Communication (Career English I/II, Reading (Culture), Reading (Society), and Reading (Literature)); ② International Understanding (International Understanding Education, Cross Cultural Coexistence, Area Studies (North America), Area Studies (China), Area Studies (Oceania), Special Lecture in International Understanding); ③ Career Support (International Business, Business English, Global Finance); and ④ Teacher Development (subjects that straddle the various disciplines, plus teaching-related subjects). They can also choose subjects other than English, such as Chinese Conversation I/II.
  • (3) Starting in the third year, depending on their desired path and aptitude, students can select subjects they are interested in from four disciplines: ① English Culture Communication (Reading, Advanced Extensive Reading I/II, Advanced Communication I–VIII, Career English I–IV, others); ② International Understanding (International Understanding Education, Cross Cultural Coexistence, International Communication, International Law, Social Information, Environment and Society, others); ③ Career Support (Practical Trade I/II, Financial Systems, Global Business Research, Trade Theory, others); and ④ Teacher Development (English, Linguistics Overview, History of Great Britain, History of the U.S., others).
Education Method
  • (1) So that students can study effectively in the first and second years, required English subjects are divided into separate classes depending on level.
  • (2) Native speakers of English teach the Basic Communication subjects to help students improve their practical communicative abilities.
  • (3) Study for the TOEIC test is incorporated into the Introduction to Career English and Career English subjects so that students can become proficient in business English.
  • (4) In subjects where the focus is on lectures, information and communication technology (ICT) is utilized as students themselves come up with tasks and seek to solve them in an active learning environment.
  • (5) In the specialized subjects in the third and fourth years, students undertake active learning that develops their practical abilities. In this learning, students further improve the English abilities they acquired in their first and second years in ① above (English Culture Communication) by studying in small groups and when possible having a native speaker of English as the instructor. In ② above (International Understanding), students use the situations and issues of the various world areas that they studied to come up with tasks that they research and present on. For ③ above, instructors who have experience in the world of management, trade, and finance teach classes. In ④ above (Teacher Development), instructors recreate authentic teaching situations as often as possible so that students gain large amounts of teaching experience.
  • (6) IBU’s Language Plaza supplements students’ in-class study. The Language Plaza meets the many different needs of students by having native speakers of English and Chinese lead practical conversation, and by having Japanese teachers provide individual guidance.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) With regards to evaluation of students in foreign language subjects, while there is a focus on in-class presentations and review and preparation of lessons, there are also short mid-term tests and end-of-term exams. In addition to rubric evaluations, student grades reflect the compilation of all short tests and end-of-term exams.
  • (2) In specialized subjects, students are given regular points as they take review tests that confirm their understanding of class content. They are also evaluated on their class participation, which is based on them using the knowledge they have gained. Thus, they are graded on things like reports and on presentations, both for content and manner.
  • (3) In all subjects, students are evaluated for their enthusiasm and manners in giving their opinions and presentations in either Japanese or a foreign language.
Admission Policy

The Department of Global Studies admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who have the intention and the will to live proactively in an increasingly globalized society.
  • 2) Those who have received basic English training while in senior high school and hope to improve their practical English language skills.
  • 3) Those who are interested in the underlying context of language, such as culture, history, politics, and economics.
  • 4) Those who are interested in different cultures and wish to have experiences in other countries.
  • 5) Those who have an interest in present-day international relations and are willing to identify problems and find their solutions.
  • 6) Those who aim to be an English teacher with a global perspective and make every effort to achieve this goal.

Department of Sociology

Fields of Study

Humanity and Social Sciences

Community and Media

Psychology

History

Diploma Policy

In the Department of Sociology, the goal is to foster people who can think in a flexible, logical, and scientific manner with regards to society, people, and culture, and the relationships between these, by acquiring the qualities that will help them contribute to a global society.
With this in mind, students should have acquired the following four types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Wide range of knowledge
    Students will have acquired a wide range of knowledge and will have developed flexible and logical thinking through study that is focused on finding one’s interests and concerns in various disciplines including sociology, psychology, and other related areas.
  • (2) High levels of expertise
    Students take an academic look at society, people, and culture, and the relationships between these, by learning knowledge and skills in specialized disciplines and understanding the logic that can be applied to these disciplines.
  • (3) Problem-solving ability
    Students set problem-solving goals related to their own interests and concerns, consider the literature that is key to solving these, and use information and communication technology (ICT) to properly process and analyze the literature and data gathered.
  • (4) Qualities needed to play an active role in society
    Students can report on the results of the research topics they have selected based on relevance to today’s global society, will have trained themselves in various abilities and qualities, and can work with others to use these, with the aim of critically understanding the presentations of others and making appropriate judgments.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The philosophy behind the curriculum in the Department of Sociology is to encourage students to learn independently in the four disciplines (courses) of Humanity and Social Sciences, Community and Environment, Media and Culture, and Psychology, along the way taking subjects each year in which they consider everything from the basics to application to knowledge. All semesters during their four years have small-group seminars that allow for the use of active learning and ICT.

  • (1) Humanity and Social Sciences course: Students grasp the basics of sociology by learning how to see and think in a sociological manner and how to collect and analyze survey material and data. Required subjects in the first year are Overview of Sociology, Sociology Theory I, and Social Pathology. In the second year onward, students choose elective subjects. In this course, students can obtain certification as a social researcher by acquiring at least 12 credits in specified subjects.
  • (2) Community and Environment course: Students acquire the practical abilities needed to play a role in today’s global society through study in which they inquire deeply into areas such as family, human relations, industry, and international relations. Required subjects in the first year are International Issues and Introduction to Fieldwork. In the second year onward, students choose elective subjects.
  • (3) Media and Culture course: Students acquire the ability to think from various angles about how people are connected and how diverse cultures are formed. In the first year, the required subject is Overview of Cultural Research and the elective subject is Mass Media Theory. From the second year onward, students choose elective subjects.
  • (4) Psychology course: Awareness of mental health is growing in various aspects of society. With this in mind, students study psychology in a wide and practical manner. In the first year, the required subject is Introduction to Psychology and the elective subject is Experimental Methodology in Psychology. From the second year onward, students choose elective subjects. In this course, students can obtain qualification as a certified psychologist by acquiring at least 36 credits in specified subjects.
  • (5) Seminars: Students improve their communication and presentation skills through active learning that includes presentations and debates. In the first year students take University Basic Seminar I and University Basic Seminar II, in the second year they take Basic Seminar I and Basic Seminar II, in the third year they take Seminar I and Seminar II, and in the fourth year they take Seminar III and Seminar IV. Students take the same seminar in the third and fourth years, and as a rule all students do their graduation research.
Education Method
  • (1) All subjects are organized so that students can acquire concrete knowledge in the various themes that are taken up.
  • (2) Students can use the knowledge they have acquired in each subject as the basis for proactively understanding the main points of the themes in each subject.
  • (3) Students can understand and consider the content of each subject based on their individual interests and concerns.
  • (4) Students can pursue themes that they have chosen that are related to their own interests and concerns.
  • (5) In seminars, we test and implement various types of teaching methods, such as active learning and methods using ICT.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) In lecture subjects, students undergo a multifaceted evaluation of their learning success, being marked primarily on periodic exams but also on mid-term tests, short tests, homework reports, and in-class reports.
  • (2) In seminar subjects, students are assessed in a practical manner via rubric evaluations, based on reports that follow set worksheets, group discussions, presentations, and more.
  • (3) Evaluations also emphasize how much individual students have grown through their studies.
Admission Policy

The Department of Sociology admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who are willing to study, observe, and consider various themes concerning society and humanity, such as human relations, psychology, family, community, business, media, culture, history, the environment, and international relations; follow their interests and seek answers to questions; and communicate the results of their research.
  • 2) Those who have the ability to understand ideas by analyzing facts, who think logically, who deal with problems from a broad perspective, who build social/human relations, and who have the passion to improve their problem-solving capacity through these abilities.
  • 3) Those who aim to be a teacher of social studies or a civil servant, or those who want to work at a company while displaying traits they acquired at IBU, such as analytical ability, insight, and the ability to take action.
  • 4) Those who would like to think outside the box as they explore a new form of human relations and society, and who seek a unique way of life in this globalizing modern world.

Major in Health and Social Welfare, Department of Human Welfare

Fields of Study

Medical Welfare

Children and Family

Welfare Management

Public Welfare

Diploma Policy

In the Major in Health and Social Welfare, the goal is to foster people who see social work from a global perspective. To this end, while emphasizing consideration for others and bonds with others, we help students acquire abilities and problem-solving capabilities with which they can understand the values and ethics of social welfare work and understand issues from the point of social welfare. Students also acquire knowledge and skills in social work.
With this in mind, students should have acquired the following five types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Power of communication
    Based on the altruistic spirit at the core of this university’s founding spirit, students are kind and considerate of others and can form bonds with them.
  • (2) “Ecological” thought
    By studying social welfare and its related disciplines, students acquire the ability to observe people and society from a range of angles (as an interconnected ecosystem).
  • (3) Specialized knowledge and skills to be a social worker
    Students can contribute to society by using the specialized knowledge and skills they learned about social welfare.
  • (4) Problem-solving abilities
    Students can balance a variety of values and work towards realizing a world of wa (harmony), which is stated in the university’s philosophy.
  • (5) Power of innovation
    Students do not stick to conventional thinking but rather use their sound and flexible thinking to continuously come up with innovative ideas.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

In the Major in Health and Social Welfare, students take lectures and seminars centered around practicums in a curriculum that teaches not only the philosophy and theory of social welfare but also allows them to learn in a hands-on manner. Students also acquire basic knowledge in medicine, psychology, sociology, nursing care, and other related disciplines.

  • (1) In the first year, students study self-awareness, ethics, values, and other basic knowledge of social welfare, in addition to related disciplines. Through hands-on, awareness-raising activities in social welfare and social welfare practicums, students become more interested in and aware of social welfare activities. Furthermore, they learn how to properly study at university, such as by learning how to take notes and write reports.
  • (2) From the second year, students take specialized subjects in the discipline of welfare, such as care for the elderly, disabled, and children, through which they acquire specialized knowledge and skills in social welfare. In the social work practicum and seminar subjects, students use what they learned in their lecture subjects, and they undergo comprehensive learning of consultation and support methods, which are the fundamentals of social welfare work. In order to do a 10-day practicum, students deepen their understanding of the realities of social work, including learning about the types of facilities and institutions they will work at, thus gaining concrete, practical understanding and skills that they can use.
  • (3) In the third year, students participate in a 23-day social work practicum at an institution for elderly or disabled patrons, a hospital, a government institution, or a social welfare association. By learning consultation and support firsthand, students gain concrete, practical understanding and skills related to social welfare. They also deepen their understanding of the qualities, skills, ethics, and self-awareness required of social workers, in the process acquiring the overall abilities to respond to situations and bringing together the theory and practice of social welfare. Under a guided practicum in psychiatric social work, students visit and work at psychiatric hospitals and clinics, and private companies offering assistance to mentally ill people, thus deepening their understanding of institutions in the field of psychiatric care. In addition, they are assigned to a seminar where they develop their understanding of social welfare by conducting research into their area of interest.
  • (4) In the fourth year, students engage in a practicum in psychiatric social work and a medical social worker internship. Using what they learned in the social work practicum, they broaden their area of expertise and deepen their knowledge. In the practicum in psychiatric social work, students pursue learning in a proactive manner at the institution they have been assigned to and based on the advice of their immediate instructor. The practicum comprises at least 60 hours at an institute for the mentally ill and at least 90 hours at a psychiatric care institution. In the medical social worker internship, students spend from 10 to 14 days learning and mastering firsthand the specialized knowledge, skills, and mindset required of a medical social worker. In their seminar, they research their area of choice for their graduation research project.
Education Method
  • (1) In the first year, students acquire the basic knowledge of social welfare and improve their communication skills through group work. In university basic seminars they study by using information and communication technology (ICT) and through active learning.
  • (2) From the second year, students take part in small-group role-playing in which they practice case studies in multi-disciplinary social work. To deepen their understanding of what occurs in social welfare situations, students attend lectures by experienced professionals working in the field.
  • (3) In the third year, students join a social work practicum under the supervision of their practicum instructor and their teacher. In this practicum, students share ideas and hold meetings where they report on their practicum, thus learning how to give presentations and deepen their abilities to observe and think. In the guided practicum in psychiatric social work, students get first-hand learning experience at a medical institution.
  • (4) In the practicum in psychiatric social work and the medical social worker internship in the fourth year, students put together all that they have learned up to this point under the supervision of their internship instructor and university teacher. After the practicum, students get together to share their practicum experiences as they theorize on what they learned and discuss how to put this to use in their future profession.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) In lecture subjects, students undergo comprehensive evaluation based on periodic tests, participation and attitude in class, and reports.
  • (2) With regards to university basic seminars, practicums, and seminar classes, students undergo rubric-based evaluations.
  • (3) In classes that are systematically interrelated, such as seminars and practicums, students are given an overall evaluation that takes into account their work across various subjects.
Admission Policy

The Major in Health and Social Welfare, Department of Human Welfare admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who are open to hearing others’ opinions.
  • 2) Those who have an interest in social issues such as declining birthrates and aging populations.
  • 3) Those who aim to enhance their knowledge and skills in social work.
  • 4) Those who can cooperate with people that have different values and tackle issues together.
  • 5) Those who participate in volunteer activities.

Faculty of Education

Department of Education

Elementary School Education Course

Students aim to be teachers of nursery, elementary, or special-needs schools; or junior or senior high school English or math teachers.

Diploma Policy

In the Department of Education, the goal is to produce outstanding and virtuous teachers and childcare workers who actively pursue the university’s founding spirit of altruism and who possess a wealth of specialized knowledge, skills, and leadership capabilities.
Students should have acquired the following three types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Qualities suitable for a teacher and childcare worker
    Students will be interested in and concerned about a wide range of problems and social issues related to education and childcare, and enthusiastically strive to pursue and solve these. Based on their sense of purpose and responsibility as a teacher or childcare worker, and on the founding spirit of this university and Buddhist thought, students will be altruistic and considerate of others, and cooperate with others to build strong relationships.
  • (2) Well-rounded education and the specialized and practical knowledge required of teachers and childcare workers
    In addition to a wide range of basic knowledge and a well-rounded education related to children, people, society, and education, students will have acquired the specialized and practical knowledge required to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (3) Strong abilities in critical thinking, decision-making, and expressing oneself
    Students will have acquired logical and critical thinking abilities and decision-making abilities that allow them to solve problems related to a range of phenomena and current issues in the fields of teaching and childcare. They can properly express the knowledge and critical thinking skills they have acquired, along with the processes and results they have decided on. They can use information and communication technology (ICT) and other means to express themselves to others and to disseminate information. In addition, they will have acquired the skills to provide the proper education and childcare that meets the particular needs of infants, children, and youth, whatever their development stage, character, environment, or situation may be.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The philosophy behind the curriculum in the Department of Education is to cultivate in each student a sense of education and childcare through the study of the fundamentals of education in the required subjects. The specialized education subjects are arranged so that students can acquire the specialized knowledge to become a teacher or childcare worker and learn the theory and practice behind education methods, and acquire licenses and qualifications in the courses that they take.

  • (1) In the first year, students take introductory education subjects. These subjects include the core subjects of Buddhism I/II, in which students learn the Buddhist spirit on which this university was founded; Introduction to Buddhism, which teaches Buddhism and the teachings of Prince Shotoku; and Modern Society and Human Rights, which raises students’ awareness of human rights. This curriculum is focused on humanities education that fosters people of outstanding character.
  • (2) The general education subjects are composed of liberal arts subjects that allow students to learn basic knowledge and skills outside of their major. By imparting a wide range of knowledge that will raise their intellectual curiosity in fields such as arts and sciences, sociology, and the natural sciences, the curriculum helps students acquire the overall knowledge they will need to participate in society. Besides subjects such as English, other foreign languages, and IT-related subjects that improve students’ abilities to express themselves in a globalizing world, there are career education subjects aimed at creating a path for students after graduation.
  • (3) The specialized education subjects are divided into general subjects and subjects in three courses. These subjects are mainly taken in the third and fourth years. All of these are aimed at giving students the specialized knowledge and the theory and practice in education methods that they need to become teachers and childcare workers.
  • (4) The general subjects include Educational Anthropology, Educational Principles, Educational Psychology, General Theory of Educational Processes, and Educational Methods and Techniques. These allow students to get a teaching education that covers the basic educational theory and practice required by a teacher or childcare worker. In each course, there are subjects in which students can study the education methods and skills needed to get licenses or qualifications, and which cultivate self-learning skills so that they can strike out on their own as an educator. After acquiring the basic knowledge in each subject, students take subjects such as Subject-Specific Education Methods I/II and Theory and Practice in Childcare, where they do research on teaching materials and learn practical ways to proceed with classroom lessons and childcare situations; and Teaching Practicum and Childcare Practicum I–III, where they experience actual teaching and childcare workplaces and polish their techniques. In Subject-Specific Seminar I–IV, students use their studies and practicum experience to establish and conduct graduation research in which they take on educational issues on their own initiative. This cultivates their ability to take on independent research projects. In Practical Teaching Seminar in the fourth year, students cap off their four years of learning by boosting their power of execution, which includes overcoming any weak points, so that they can get right to work in a real-world teaching situation.
Education Method
  • (1) In both lectures and seminars, students are involved in group work in which they pursue solutions to problems through discussions and presentations, thus allowing for a two-way learning process between teacher and student and maximizing the educational benefit.
  • (2) Learning methods and equipment are constantly being updated to keep up with educational developments and progress in IT. There are active learning classrooms, mock ICT classrooms, interactive whiteboards, tablets, online computers, and audiovisual equipment, all of which are utilized to cultivate students’ practical skills through, for example, mock classes (in which students are videotaped while they practice their teaching methods), and to give students better teaching techniques and leadership abilities.
  • (3) So that students can keep up with the latest in education and understand the role of teachers and childcare workers in kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools, graduates of this university who are now working in the field of education come to give workshops and seminars.
  • (4) In addition to a teaching practicum in the third year, there are school internships and community volunteer activities in the first and second years, giving students numerous opportunities to practice being a teacher or childcare worker at kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) Students undergo comprehensive evaluations of how well they have achieved the educational objectives of the classes through periodic exams, short tests, and reports. They are also evaluated for classroom participation and attitude, motivation, and attendance. The classes themselves are evaluated by the students.
  • (2) Besides rubrics that show evaluation perspective and level, the learning situation of the students is measured objectively using self-evaluations and evaluations by class instructors.
  • (3) Through periodic inspection of the students’ credit checklist and through evaluation of student activities in lectures, teaching practicums (in kindergarten, and elementary and junior high school), childcare practicums, and nursing care practicums, students are evaluated on whether they have the qualities and abilities needed to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (4) In seminars and other small classes where students study in small groups, students are evaluated on how well they perform in the processes of learning and in pursuing assignments.
Admission Policy

The Elementary School Education Course, Department of Education admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who are determined and passionate about becoming a good teacher and who, while studying their specialist field, can keep exploring what makes a good teacher.
  • 2) Those who care about children’s issues and who consider each child’s need for individualized support and care.
  • 3) Those who can strive to understand children’s growth and can study elementary school education in depth while understanding the relations between early childhood education, junior and senior high school education, and special-needs education.
  • 4) Those who want to build well-rounded social relationships and cooperate with others through dialogues with other people and with society at large.
  • 5) Those with a diverse high-school background who are willing to apply their knowledge in educational activities while addressing modern educational issues from a broad perspective.
  • 6) Those who have an inquiring and insightful mindset, can boldly take on new challenges, and cooperate with others.

Early Childhood Education Course

Students aim to be teachers of nursery or elementary schools, or childcare workers.

Diploma Policy

In the Department of Education, the goal is to produce outstanding and virtuous teachers and childcare workers who actively pursue the university’s founding spirit of altruism and who possess a wealth of specialized knowledge, skills, and leadership capabilities.
Students should have acquired the following three types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Qualities suitable for a teacher and childcare worker
    Students will be interested in and concerned about a wide range of problems and social issues related to education and childcare, and enthusiastically strive to pursue and solve these. Based on their sense of purpose and responsibility as a teacher or childcare worker, and on the founding spirit of this university and Buddhist thought, students will be altruistic and considerate of others, and cooperate with others to build strong relationships.
  • (2) Well-rounded education and the specialized and practical knowledge required of teachers and childcare workers
    In addition to a wide range of basic knowledge and a well-rounded education related to children, people, society, and education, students will have acquired the specialized and practical knowledge required to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (3) Strong abilities in critical thinking, decision-making, and expressing oneself
    Students will have acquired logical and critical thinking abilities and decision-making abilities that allow them to solve problems related to a range of phenomena and current issues in the fields of teaching and childcare. They can properly express the knowledge and critical thinking skills they have acquired, along with the processes and results they have decided on. They can use information and communication technology (ICT) and other means to express themselves to others and to disseminate information. In addition, they will have acquired the skills to provide the proper education and childcare that meets the particular needs of infants, children, and youth, whatever their development stage, character, environment, or situation may be.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The philosophy behind the curriculum in the Department of Education is to cultivate in each student a sense of education and childcare through the study of the fundamentals of education in the required subjects. The specialized education subjects are arranged so that students can acquire the specialized knowledge to become a teacher or childcare worker and learn the theory and practice behind education methods, and acquire licenses and qualifications in the courses that they take.

  • (1) In the first year, students take introductory education subjects. These subjects include the core subjects of Buddhism I/II, in which students learn the Buddhist spirit on which this university was founded; Introduction to Buddhism, which teaches Buddhism and the teachings of Prince Shotoku; and Modern Society and Human Rights, which raises students’ awareness of human rights. This curriculum is focused on humanities education that fosters people of outstanding character.
  • (2) The general education subjects are composed of liberal arts subjects that allow students to learn basic knowledge and skills outside of their major. By imparting a wide range of knowledge that will raise their intellectual curiosity in fields such as arts and sciences, sociology, and the natural sciences, the curriculum helps students acquire the overall knowledge they will need to participate in society. Besides subjects such as English, other foreign languages, and IT-related subjects that improve students’ abilities to express themselves in a globalizing world, there are career education subjects aimed at creating a path for students after graduation.
  • (3) The specialized education subjects are divided into general subjects and subjects in three courses. These subjects are mainly taken in the third and fourth years. All of these are aimed at giving students the specialized knowledge and the theory and practice in education methods that they need to become teachers and childcare workers.
  • (4) The general subjects include Educational Anthropology, Educational Principles, Educational Psychology, General Theory of Educational Processes, and Educational Methods and Techniques. These allow students to get a teaching education that covers the basic educational theory and practice required by a teacher or childcare worker. In each course, there are subjects in which students can study the education methods and skills needed to get licenses or qualifications, and which cultivate self-learning skills so that they can strike out on their own as an educator. After acquiring the basic knowledge in each subject, students take subjects such as Subject-Specific Education Methods I/II and Theory and Practice in Childcare, where they do research on teaching materials and learn practical ways to proceed with classroom lessons and childcare situations; and Teaching Practicum and Childcare Practicum I–III, where they experience actual teaching and childcare workplaces and polish their techniques. In Subject-Specific Seminar I–IV, students use their studies and practicum experience to establish and conduct graduation research in which they take on educational issues on their own initiative. This cultivates their ability to take on independent research projects. In Practical Teaching Seminar in the fourth year, students cap off their four years of learning by boosting their power of execution, which includes overcoming any weak points, so that they can get right to work in a real-world teaching situation.
Education Method
  • (1) In both lectures and seminars, students are involved in group work in which they pursue solutions to problems through discussions and presentations, thus allowing for a two-way learning process between teacher and student and maximizing the educational benefit.
  • (2) Learning methods and equipment are constantly being updated to keep up with educational developments and progress in IT. There are active learning classrooms, mock ICT classrooms, interactive whiteboards, tablets, online computers, and audiovisual equipment, all of which are utilized to cultivate students’ practical skills through, for example, mock classes (in which students are videotaped while they practice their teaching methods), and to give students better teaching techniques and leadership abilities.
  • (3) So that students can keep up with the latest in education and understand the role of teachers and childcare workers in kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools, graduates of this university who are now working in the field of education come to give workshops and seminars.
  • (4) In addition to a teaching practicum in the third year, there are school internships and community volunteer activities in the first and second years, giving students numerous opportunities to practice being a teacher or childcare worker at kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) Students undergo comprehensive evaluations of how well they have achieved the educational objectives of the classes through periodic exams, short tests, and reports. They are also evaluated for classroom participation and attitude, motivation, and attendance. The classes themselves are evaluated by the students.
  • (2) Besides rubrics that show evaluation perspective and level, the learning situation of the students is measured objectively using self-evaluations and evaluations by class instructors.
  • (3) Through periodic inspection of the students’ credit checklist and through evaluation of student activities in lectures, teaching practicums (in kindergarten, and elementary and junior high school), childcare practicums, and nursing care practicums, students are evaluated on whether they have the qualities and abilities needed to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (4) In seminars and other small classes where students study in small groups, students are evaluated on how well they perform in the processes of learning and in pursuing assignments.
Admission Policy

The Early Childhood Education Course, Department of Education admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who are determined and passionate about becoming a good teacher and who, while studying their specialist field, can keep exploring what makes a good teacher.
  • 2) Those who respect each child as a human being, sympathize with each child’s feelings, and want to think about support and care according to each child’s developmental stage.
  • 3) Those who strive to understand the continuity from preschool education and childcare through to elementary school education, while also understanding how children grow and learn through play.
  • 4) Those who have an interest in children’s family backgrounds and their local communities, and who are willing to acquire the expertise needed to support and cooperate not only with children but also with their guardians.
  • 5) Those with a diverse high-school background who are willing to apply their knowledge in educational and childcare activities while addressing modern educational and childcare issues from a broad perspective.
  • 6) Those who have an inquiring and insightful mindset, can boldly take on new challenges, and cooperate with others.

Junior or Senior High School English Education Course

Students aim to be junior or senior high school English teachers, or elementary school teachers.

Diploma Policy

In the Department of Education, the goal is to produce outstanding and virtuous teachers and childcare workers who actively pursue the university’s founding spirit of altruism and who possess a wealth of specialized knowledge, skills, and leadership capabilities.
Students should have acquired the following three types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Qualities suitable for a teacher and childcare worker
    Students will be interested in and concerned about a wide range of problems and social issues related to education and childcare, and enthusiastically strive to pursue and solve these. Based on their sense of purpose and responsibility as a teacher or childcare worker, and on the founding spirit of this university and Buddhist thought, students will be altruistic and considerate of others, and cooperate with others to build strong relationships.
  • (2) Well-rounded education and the specialized and practical knowledge required of teachers and childcare workers
    In addition to a wide range of basic knowledge and a well-rounded education related to children, people, society, and education, students will have acquired the specialized and practical knowledge required to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (3) Strong abilities in critical thinking, decision-making, and expressing oneself
    Students will have acquired logical and critical thinking abilities and decision-making abilities that allow them to solve problems related to a range of phenomena and current issues in the fields of teaching and childcare. They can properly express the knowledge and critical thinking skills they have acquired, along with the processes and results they have decided on. They can use information and communication technology (ICT) and other means to express themselves to others and to disseminate information. In addition, they will have acquired the skills to provide the proper education and childcare that meets the particular needs of infants, children, and youth, whatever their development stage, character, environment, or situation may be.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The philosophy behind the curriculum in the Department of Education is to cultivate in each student a sense of education and childcare through the study of the fundamentals of education in the required subjects. The specialized education subjects are arranged so that students can acquire the specialized knowledge to become a teacher or childcare worker and learn the theory and practice behind education methods, and acquire licenses and qualifications in the courses that they take.

  • (1) In the first year, students take introductory education subjects. These subjects include the core subjects of Buddhism I/II, in which students learn the Buddhist spirit on which this university was founded; Introduction to Buddhism, which teaches Buddhism and the teachings of Prince Shotoku; and Modern Society and Human Rights, which raises students’ awareness of human rights. This curriculum is focused on humanities education that fosters people of outstanding character.
  • (2) The general education subjects are composed of liberal arts subjects that allow students to learn basic knowledge and skills outside of their major. By imparting a wide range of knowledge that will raise their intellectual curiosity in fields such as arts and sciences, sociology, and the natural sciences, the curriculum helps students acquire the overall knowledge they will need to participate in society. Besides subjects such as English, other foreign languages, and IT-related subjects that improve students’ abilities to express themselves in a globalizing world, there are career education subjects aimed at creating a path for students after graduation.
  • (3) The specialized education subjects are divided into general subjects and subjects in three courses. These subjects are mainly taken in the third and fourth years. All of these are aimed at giving students the specialized knowledge and the theory and practice in education methods that they need to become teachers and childcare workers.
  • (4) The general subjects include Educational Anthropology, Educational Principles, Educational Psychology, General Theory of Educational Processes, and Educational Methods and Techniques. These allow students to get a teaching education that covers the basic educational theory and practice required by a teacher or childcare worker. In each course, there are subjects in which students can study the education methods and skills needed to get licenses or qualifications, and which cultivate self-learning skills so that they can strike out on their own as an educator. After acquiring the basic knowledge in each subject, students take subjects such as Subject-Specific Education Methods I/II and Theory and Practice in Childcare, where they do research on teaching materials and learn practical ways to proceed with classroom lessons and childcare situations; and Teaching Practicum and Childcare Practicum I–III, where they experience actual teaching and childcare workplaces and polish their techniques. In Subject-Specific Seminar I–IV, students use their studies and practicum experience to establish and conduct graduation research in which they take on educational issues on their own initiative. This cultivates their ability to take on independent research projects. In Practical Teaching Seminar in the fourth year, students cap off their four years of learning by boosting their power of execution, which includes overcoming any weak points, so that they can get right to work in a real-world teaching situation.
Education Method
  • (1) In both lectures and seminars, students are involved in group work in which they pursue solutions to problems through discussions and presentations, thus allowing for a two-way learning process between teacher and student and maximizing the educational benefit.
  • (2) Learning methods and equipment are constantly being updated to keep up with educational developments and progress in IT. There are active learning classrooms, mock ICT classrooms, interactive whiteboards, tablets, online computers, and audiovisual equipment, all of which are utilized to cultivate students’ practical skills through, for example, mock classes (in which students are videotaped while they practice their teaching methods), and to give students better teaching techniques and leadership abilities.
  • (3) So that students can keep up with the latest in education and understand the role of teachers and childcare workers in kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools, graduates of this university who are now working in the field of education come to give workshops and seminars.
  • (4) In addition to a teaching practicum in the third year, there are school internships and community volunteer activities in the first and second years, giving students numerous opportunities to practice being a teacher or childcare worker at kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) Students undergo comprehensive evaluations of how well they have achieved the educational objectives of the classes through periodic exams, short tests, and reports. They are also evaluated for classroom participation and attitude, motivation, and attendance. The classes themselves are evaluated by the students.
  • (2) Besides rubrics that show evaluation perspective and level, the learning situation of the students is measured objectively using self-evaluations and evaluations by class instructors.
  • (3) Through periodic inspection of the students’ credit checklist and through evaluation of student activities in lectures, teaching practicums (in kindergarten, and elementary and junior high school), childcare practicums, and nursing care practicums, students are evaluated on whether they have the qualities and abilities needed to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (4) In seminars and other small classes where students study in small groups, students are evaluated on how well they perform in the processes of learning and in pursuing assignments.
Admission Policy

The Junior or Senior High School English Education Course, Department of Education admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who are determined and passionate about becoming a good teacher and who, while studying their specialist field, can keep exploring what makes a good teacher.
  • 2) Those who are sympathetic to students’ various issues and needs and are willing to support and care for each individual student.
  • 3) Those with the requisite high-school proficiency in English who want to keep broadening their knowledge of English and English teaching methods, and foster their own proficiency in the language.
  • 4) Those who can keep striving to make lesson plans that match the circumstances of the students, the school, and the local community, while fostering the skills for implementing such plans.
  • 5) Those who can use English to offer a window onto different cultures.
  • 6) Those who have an inquiring and insightful mindset, can boldly take on new challenges, and cooperate with others.

Health Education Course

Students aim to be school nurses or elementary school teachers.

Diploma Policy

In the Department of Education, the goal is to produce outstanding and virtuous teachers and childcare workers who actively pursue the university’s founding spirit of altruism and who possess a wealth of specialized knowledge, skills, and leadership capabilities.
Students should have acquired the following three types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Qualities suitable for a teacher and childcare worker
    Students will be interested in and concerned about a wide range of problems and social issues related to education and childcare, and enthusiastically strive to pursue and solve these. Based on their sense of purpose and responsibility as a teacher or childcare worker, and on the founding spirit of this university and Buddhist thought, students will be altruistic and considerate of others, and cooperate with others to build strong relationships.
  • (2) Well-rounded education and the specialized and practical knowledge required of teachers and childcare workers
    In addition to a wide range of basic knowledge and a well-rounded education related to children, people, society, and education, students will have acquired the specialized and practical knowledge required to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (3) Strong abilities in critical thinking, decision-making, and expressing oneself
    Students will have acquired logical and critical thinking abilities and decision-making abilities that allow them to solve problems related to a range of phenomena and current issues in the fields of teaching and childcare. They can properly express the knowledge and critical thinking skills they have acquired, along with the processes and results they have decided on. They can use information and communication technology (ICT) and other means to express themselves to others and to disseminate information. In addition, they will have acquired the skills to provide the proper education and childcare that meets the particular needs of infants, children, and youth, whatever their development stage, character, environment, or situation may be.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The philosophy behind the curriculum in the Department of Education is to cultivate in each student a sense of education and childcare through the study of the fundamentals of education in the required subjects. The specialized education subjects are arranged so that students can acquire the specialized knowledge to become a teacher or childcare worker and learn the theory and practice behind education methods, and acquire licenses and qualifications in the courses that they take.

  • (1) In the first year, students take introductory education subjects. These subjects include the core subjects of Buddhism I/II, in which students learn the Buddhist spirit on which this university was founded; Introduction to Buddhism, which teaches Buddhism and the teachings of Prince Shotoku; and Modern Society and Human Rights, which raises students’ awareness of human rights. This curriculum is focused on humanities education that fosters people of outstanding character.
  • (2) The general education subjects are composed of liberal arts subjects that allow students to learn basic knowledge and skills outside of their major. By imparting a wide range of knowledge that will raise their intellectual curiosity in fields such as arts and sciences, sociology, and the natural sciences, the curriculum helps students acquire the overall knowledge they will need to participate in society. Besides subjects such as English, other foreign languages, and IT-related subjects that improve students’ abilities to express themselves in a globalizing world, there are career education subjects aimed at creating a path for students after graduation.
  • (3) The specialized education subjects are divided into general subjects and subjects in three courses. These subjects are mainly taken in the third and fourth years. All of these are aimed at giving students the specialized knowledge and the theory and practice in education methods that they need to become teachers and childcare workers.
  • (4) The general subjects include Educational Anthropology, Educational Principles, Educational Psychology, General Theory of Educational Processes, and Educational Methods and Techniques. These allow students to get a teaching education that covers the basic educational theory and practice required by a teacher or childcare worker. In each course, there are subjects in which students can study the education methods and skills needed to get licenses or qualifications, and which cultivate self-learning skills so that they can strike out on their own as an educator. After acquiring the basic knowledge in each subject, students take subjects such as Subject-Specific Education Methods I/II and Theory and Practice in Childcare, where they do research on teaching materials and learn practical ways to proceed with classroom lessons and childcare situations; and Teaching Practicum and Childcare Practicum I–III, where they experience actual teaching and childcare workplaces and polish their techniques. In Subject-Specific Seminar I–IV, students use their studies and practicum experience to establish and conduct graduation research in which they take on educational issues on their own initiative. This cultivates their ability to take on independent research projects. In Practical Teaching Seminar in the fourth year, students cap off their four years of learning by boosting their power of execution, which includes overcoming any weak points, so that they can get right to work in a real-world teaching situation.
Education Method
  • (1) In both lectures and seminars, students are involved in group work in which they pursue solutions to problems through discussions and presentations, thus allowing for a two-way learning process between teacher and student and maximizing the educational benefit.
  • (2) Learning methods and equipment are constantly being updated to keep up with educational developments and progress in IT. There are active learning classrooms, mock ICT classrooms, interactive whiteboards, tablets, online computers, and audiovisual equipment, all of which are utilized to cultivate students’ practical skills through, for example, mock classes (in which students are videotaped while they practice their teaching methods), and to give students better teaching techniques and leadership abilities.
  • (3) So that students can keep up with the latest in education and understand the role of teachers and childcare workers in kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools, graduates of this university who are now working in the field of education come to give workshops and seminars.
  • (4) In addition to a teaching practicum in the third year, there are school internships and community volunteer activities in the first and second years, giving students numerous opportunities to practice being a teacher or childcare worker at kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, and nursery schools.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) Students undergo comprehensive evaluations of how well they have achieved the educational objectives of the classes through periodic exams, short tests, and reports. They are also evaluated for classroom participation and attitude, motivation, and attendance. The classes themselves are evaluated by the students.
  • (2) Besides rubrics that show evaluation perspective and level, the learning situation of the students is measured objectively using self-evaluations and evaluations by class instructors.
  • (3) Through periodic inspection of the students’ credit checklist and through evaluation of student activities in lectures, teaching practicums (in kindergarten, and elementary and junior high school), childcare practicums, and nursing care practicums, students are evaluated on whether they have the qualities and abilities needed to be a teacher or childcare worker.
  • (4) In seminars and other small classes where students study in small groups, students are evaluated on how well they perform in the processes of learning and in pursuing assignments.
Admission Policy

The Health Education Course, Department of Education admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who are determined and passionate about becoming a good teacher and who, while studying their specialist field, can keep exploring what makes a good teacher.
  • 2) Those who can listen openly to children’s comments, are sympathetic to children’s various issues and needs, and want to consider each child’s individual needs for support and care.
  • 3) Those who aim to become a school nurse with excellent supervisory skills that will be used to promote healthy lifelong habits among children.
  • 4) Those who want to build well-rounded social relationships and cooperate with others through dialogues with other people and with society at large.
  • 5) Those with a diverse high-school background who are willing to apply their knowledge to educational activities while taking a broad perspective on modern educational and social issues and children’s physical and mental health issues.
  • 6) Those who have an inquiring and insightful mindset, can boldly take on new challenges, and cooperate with others.

Faculty of Business Administration

Department of Business Administration

Major in Public Management

Students aim to contribute to the local community by becoming national civil servants such as tax officers, or local government employees working in general administration or public safety.

Diploma Policy

The Major in Public Management in the Department of Business Administration seeks to develop individuals who can contribute to the public by working in the public sector as national or regional civil servants. It also aims to foster people who can take leadership roles in the private sector. By looking ahead to each student’s future and by nurturing their character, we aim to help students grow into well-rounded individuals.
With this in mind, students should have acquired the following four types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) A well-rounded education and expertise as a civil servant
    Students will have systematically acquired a well-rounded education and the specialized knowledge needed to play an active role in the public or private sector.
  • (2) The ability to solve problems and contribute to society
    Students will have a deep understanding of the importance of public administration, local communities, and non-profit organizations (NPOs), and of the collaborative efforts among these groups. They will also display flexible thinking and sound judgment when proposing policies for revitalizing or developing local communities to meet the needs of the day. Students will also be able to think logically to solve complex social issues and plan public policies by analyzing issues from an objective and multifaceted perspective.
  • (3) Communication skills for working with others
    Students will have the skills to convey their knowledge and opinions effortlessly and to persuade others. They will also have the communication skills needed to take part in a global society.
  • (4) The ability to achieve self-fulfillment in a changing society
    Students will have a strong desire to serve society by upholding the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku. To play a role in public administration, they will have a firm sense of ethics that will allow them to meet the expectations of society and win its trust, and they will be driven by a responsibility to prioritize the public interest. Students will also have an acute sense of societal trends on both the local and global level, and they will be willing to develop so that they can utilize their knowledge, skills, and experience for the good of society.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The curriculum of the Major in Public Management apportions specialized subjects to each year, so that students can learn steadily and thoroughly. The curriculum covers various disciplines in line with students’ advancement through each year. Introductory subjects give students a well-rounded education that nurtures their awareness of human rights and that prepares them for a future career in business or civil service. Specialized subjects help students to grow in response to changes in society.
Because we want each student to expand their potential after they enter the workforce, we ensure that their learning goes beyond the subjects in their major. Students can effectively gain specialized knowledge by taking a wide range of subjects, including those common to all majors. We also provide many opportunities for students to acquire qualifications and to have hands-on learning experiences both in and outside the university.

  • (1) Subjects for acquiring basic knowledge of business administration and law
    Following a step-by-step process from the basics to the applied, students systematically learn about business administration and law, which are the two subjects that form the basis of education in the Department of Business Administration.
  • (2) Subjects that form the foundation for working as a civil servant
    Students systematically acquire the basic knowledge required of civil servants. Subjects include the Japanese Constitution, Civil Law, Economics, History, career seminars for passing the civil service qualification exam, and special seminars for public security jobs.
  • (3) Specialized subjects needed to work as a civil servant
    Students acquire the knowledge needed to pass the civil service qualification exam and build the intellectual foundations for working as a civil servant. For this purpose, they study specialized disciplines required for those aiming to be civil servants. Subjects include finance and politics, with students also attending special seminars on working in public administration.
  • (4) Subjects to deepen understanding of organizations in the public and private sectors that support local communities
    Fulfilling one’s responsibilities as a civil servant requires a deep understanding of the relationships and collaborations between government and private corporations. With this in mind, we incorporate active learning and information and communication technology (ICT) in subjects such as Practical Management (which deepens understanding of civil service and private enterprises) and in the Regional Revitalization Seminar (which covers collaborations with local communities). This allows students to develop the ability to act on their own initiative and to think logically, so that they can identify and solve problems relating to the revitalization and development of local communities.
  • (5) Subjects to nurture qualities as a civil servant
    In addition to the aforementioned subjects, the course includes subjects such as Law and Ethics and other career-focused subjects that foster a moral attitude rooted in the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku upon which IBU was founded. These subjects enhance students’ systematic learning of specialized subjects, such as Administrative Law, which are directly linked to the duties of a civil servant. In addition, specialized seminars incorporate active learning and ICT to effectively boost students’ capabilities as a civil servant.
Education Method

In all subjects related to public management, classes are not limited to conventional lectures. We incorporate an active learning approach in which students utilize ICT, take a proactive approach to research and analysis, draw their own conclusions, and conduct presentations and discussions. Interactive lectures enable students to acquire the knowledge needed to be a civil servant. These lectures promote systematic learning and provide the kind of well-rounded education needed to pass the civil service qualification exam. Students receive practical and concrete guidance that readies them to enter the workforce as soon as they graduate. In specialized subjects and specialized seminars, students take the initiative to examine the duties of a civil servant from academic and practical perspectives. They also develop a high level of awareness about human rights, which is a prerequisite for working in civil service.

Based on the university’s founding spirit, students raise their ethical awareness, another prerequisite for working in civil service. As part of their extramural activities, they also actively engage with local communities. This allows them to deepen their understanding of public administration, the cornerstone of any community. By experiencing community outreach, students are able to learn in a practical way about local communities.

Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) In all subjects related to public management, basic evaluation is done through end-of-term exams that measure how much a student has learned. Students also take short tests and mid-term exams, and they write papers. They are also evaluated on their daily classroom attitude, such as on their presentations, questions, and eagerness to learn.
  • (2) In lectures on civil service, students are evaluated through short on-the-spot tests and through end-of-term exams.
  • (3) In subjects that incorporate active learning and ICT, students are given an overall evaluation of their attitude toward self-development. This includes a student’s initiative and the ability to cooperate with others in group work, presentations, and field work. They are also evaluated on their attitude toward serving the community, on their actual efforts, and on their ability to utilize ICT to write comprehensive papers and conduct research assignments.
Admission Policy

The Major in Public Management, Department of Business Administration admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those with a diverse high-school background who are determined to make the most of their expert knowledge and real-life experience in business administration and law.
  • 2) Those who have a strong intention to contribute to society by playing an active role in various fields as a civil servant.
  • 3) Those who were involved in extracurricular or volunteer activities in high school, can cooperate with others to finish group assignments, and can make logical explanations when giving presentations and reports.
  • 4) Those who, when entering IBU, strive to understand the spirit of wa (harmony—the founding principle of IBU advocated by Prince Shotoku), are considerate towards other people, and can act in harmony with others.
  • 5) Those who can actively take on pre-class e-learning sessions and paper assignments.

Major in Corporate Management

Students aim to become individuals that can be active in all fields of industry, ranging from local companies to multinational enterprises.

Diploma Policy

The Major in Corporate Management in the Department of Business Administration seeks to develop individuals who can play an active role in the private sector. It aims to foster people who can harness an entrepreneurial spirit to create, develop, and share new business ideas. By looking ahead to each student’s future and by nurturing their character, we aim to help students grow into well-rounded individuals. With this in mind, students should have acquired the following four types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) A well-rounded education and expertise to take leadership
    Students will have systematically acquired a well-rounded education and specialized knowledge in business administration.
  • (2) The ability to solve problems as a leader
    Students will be able to respond to various issues by making sound judgments and by having the power to persuade others. They will be able to think independently and creatively, taking into account economic and business realities as well as societal and economic trends. They will have the ability to discover and solve issues in business by using their expertise to accurately understand and analyze them and by cooperating with others.
  • (3) Communication skills for working with others
    Students will have a sufficiently high level of skills to fulfill their duties. They will also possess diverse communication skills and the ability to connect with others—requirements for those taking part in a global society.
  • (4) The ability to achieve self-fulfillment in a changing society
    Students will have a firm sense of ethics and purpose, and they will seek to contribute to society in line with the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku. They will have an interest in various issues and will be able to respond flexibly and appropriately to changes in society. They will also have the drive to keep acquiring further knowledge and skills relevant to their career.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The curriculum of the Major in Corporate Management apportions specialized subjects to each year, so that students can learn steadily and thoroughly. The curriculum covers various disciplines, ranging from fundamental education to practical knowledge and skills. Some subjects are designed to ready students for the workforce, while others prepare them to grow in response to societal changes.
Because we want each student to expand their potential after they enter the workforce, we ensure that their learning goes beyond the subjects in their major. Students can effectively gain specialized knowledge by taking a wide range of subjects, including those common to all majors. We also provide many opportunities for students to acquire qualifications and to have hands-on learning experiences both in and outside the university.

  • (1) Subjects for acquiring basic knowledge of business administration
    Following a step-by-step process from the basics to the applied, students systematically learn about business administration and law, which are the two subjects that form the basis of education in the Department of Business Administration.
  • (2) Specialized subjects to deepen practical knowledge of occupations and corporate management
    Various subjects on business, corporate management, and occupations are taught in practical hands-on classes. We also incorporate information and communication technology (ICT) education and active learning, so that students can get a concrete and comprehensive education.
  • (3) Subjects for acquiring public qualifications
    These subjects allow students to thoroughly acquire specialized knowledge while equipping them to achieve their goals. Students are explicitly taught that studying for and passing public qualification tests can give them specialized knowledge that opens up future career paths. Guidance is given so that students can start by studying for basic public qualifications and then go on to advanced national qualifications. We provide guidance on qualifications and certifications such as bookkeeping, financial planning, retail marketing, practical business law, and practical business etiquette.
  • (4) Subjects directly linked to career development
    Students study comprehensively and with a global perspective. Having determined their desired career path, they raise their level of expertise in areas directly linked to their future career. They build on what they have learned and take part in internship programs (in Japan and abroad) that are in line with their future career paths.
  • (5) General subjects for a well-rounded education
    Students take these subjects as needed to obtain general knowledge, broaden their education, and develop their professional etiquette, which are essential qualities for anyone in the workforce. Having learned these subjects, students are better able to contribute to a global society by upholding high ethical standards and a sense of purpose, in line with the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku.
Education Method

In all subjects related to corporate management, classes include conventional lectures along with classes in which students interact with each other and with teachers. We provide regular opportunities for active learning: students choose their own study themes and take a proactive approach to research, analysis, presentations, and discussions.

To develop students’ career paths, career education subjects are provided from the first year onwards. Japan-based internships are compulsory. Overseas internship programs are also offered; these help to develop students into professionals with a global mindset.

The curriculum also covers classes for acquiring public certifications, such as bookkeeping, financial planning, retail marketing, IT, practical business law, and practical business etiquette. To make it easy for students to take qualification exams, we provide guidance and follow a progressive learning approach from the introductory level to the advanced level.

Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) In all subjects related to corporate management, basic evaluation is done through end-of-term exams that measure how much a student has learned. Students also take short tests and mid-term exams, and they write assignments. They are also given an overall evaluation on their reports, presentations, daily attitude to learning, and participation in active-learning group work.
  • (2) In subjects needed for acquiring public qualifications, students are evaluated on short tests, mid-term exams, and end-of-term exams, as well as on their daily classroom attitude and results in qualification tests.
  • (3) For internships in Japan and abroad, we cooperate with the companies providing internships to give a detailed evaluation with an eye to the attainment of practical objectives.
Admission Policy

The Major in Corporate Management, Department of Business Administration admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those with a diverse high-school background who are determined to make the most of their expert knowledge and real-life experience in business administration.
  • 2) Those who intend to start their own business or work at a corporation or other organization, and who are determined to actively and sincerely work to obtain qualifications or take part in an internship in Japan or overseas.
  • 3) Those who were involved in extracurricular or volunteer activities in high school, can cooperate with others to finish group assignments, and can make logical presentations and reports.
  • 4) Those who, when entering IBU, strive to understand the spirit of wa (harmony—the founding principle of IBU advocated by Prince Shotoku), are considerate towards others, and can act in harmony with others.
  • 5) Those who can actively take on pre-class e-learning sessions and paper assignments.

Faculty of Nursing

Department of Nursing

Diploma Policy

The basic objective of the Faculty of Nursing, in line with IBU’s educational philosophy, is to have students acquire the following qualities: (1) a well-rounded education and high ethical standards, (2) the initiative and creativity to think on their own and to identify and solve problems, and (3) the ability to keep in mind the essentials of nursing while deploying their practical skills to provide the best nursing care possible under the circumstances. By the time they graduate, students should have acquired the following abilities and qualities:

1. High ethical standards and the ability to connect with others.
  • (1) Students will thoroughly understand the human condition from various perspectives.
  • (2) Students will be able to understand others and be understood, and they will be able to build relationships in which both parties grow together.
  • (3) Students will be able to uphold human rights and dignity.
2. The ability to identify problems and deal with them.
  • (1) Students will be able to make appropriate use of information.
  • (2) Students will be able to identify problems, prioritize them, devise solutions, and act accordingly.
  • (3) Students will have systematically acquired wide-ranging interdisciplinary knowledge and specialized knowledge in nursing science.
3. Practical nursing skills to support patients’ health and lifestyles through a comprehensive and ongoing approach.
  • (1) Students will be able to practice nursing that deals with specific health issues.
  • (2) Students will be able to practice evidence-based nursing.
  • (3) Students will be able to find and enact solutions to health issues in the community.
4. Awareness of a nurse’s responsibilities and the ability to cooperate with people in other professions.
  • (1) Students will understand the roles and responsibilities of nursing in today’s society.
  • (2) Students will have respect for the expertise of those in other professions and will be able to cooperate with them in exchanging information and solving problems.
5. The ability to initiate change.
  • (1) Students will take an interest in societal trends and changes in people’s healthcare needs.
  • (2) Students will be responsive to new health issues, and they will take a voluntary and creative approach toward nursing.
  • (3) Students will be self-assured and always ready for new challenges.
6. Basic abilities for acting on the global stage.
  • (1) Students will be aware of and will understand the background behind the various health issues happening in local communities and around the world.
  • (2) Students will be open-minded toward people with different values or cultural backgrounds, and they will be able to build friendly relationships with them.
  • (3) Students will be willing to offer their specialist nursing abilities for international volunteer activities.
7. The ability to continue self-improvement.
  • (1) Students will have acquired an attitude of continuous life-long voluntary self-development.
  • (2) Students will be able to identify their own areas for improvement in their quest for better nursing.
Curriculum Policy

The curriculum of the Faculty of Nursing apportions subjects so that students can, during their four years at IBU, effectively and steadily acquire the abilities and qualities designated in the Diploma Policy. Our educational approach is centered on active learning, with an emphasis on getting students to be self-directed in their research and thinking. Teaching staff must therefore understand the concept of active learning and must be able to employ the relevant teaching methods. They must also support students’ education by preparing an environment conducive to learning and by setting clear tasks and educational goals for the students. The Curriculum Policy of the Faculty of Nursing is as follows:

  • 1) Students are encouraged to consider the value of caregiving and to establish a personal view of nursing that will serve as the foundation of their nursing practice.
  • 2) Exposure to numerous liberal arts subjects helps students develop their humanity and high ethical standards, while giving them the kind of broad-ranging interdisciplinary knowledge one needs to understand people, society, and the environment.
  • 3) Education focuses not merely on feeding knowledge to students but on fostering their ability to think for themselves. Students’ own awareness and thinking are respected, and they are encouraged to express their opinions and thoughts freely and act accordingly.
  • 4) Lectures, seminars, and practicums are all connected. This helps students to see how health is closely related to lifestyle and culture and what is involved in supporting the lives of others. This allows students to practice nursing with a focus on real-life conditions.
  • 5) We provide various opportunities for practice. On-site learning enables students to appreciate the importance of nursing in the community.
  • 6) So that students can understand why and how they should cooperate with people in other professions, they are given opportunities to learn in real-life situations.
  • 7) So that students can understand the world’s health issues with a global perspective, they are given opportunities for cross-cultural experiences, overseas training, and other similar programs.
  • 8) Students are supported in mapping out their own nursing-based career path.
Admission Policy

The Faculty of Nursing admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the university’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who have the fundamental academic ability to study nursing science.
  • 2) Those who value the lives and dignity of people and who strive to understand other people’s pain and suffering.
  • 3) Those who have a sincere attitude toward education and who can learn on their own initiative.
  • 4) Those who believe in the potential of people and in their mental flexibility, and who take an interest in the human condition.
  • 5) Those who are not afraid to make mistakes and who can learn from their mistakes for the sake of personal growth.
  • 6) Those who are committed to contributing to society through nursing.

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