Graduate School

Department of Human Welfare, School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Master’s Course—Two Years

Students study a balance of basic theory, policies/systems/services, and social work.

  • 1. Development of professionals (leaders in welfare) with high levels of expertise and practical skills.
  • 2. Preparation of master’s theses.

Students who complete the Master’s Course (two years) are given a master’s degree in Human Welfare.

Diploma Policy

The Master’s Course in the Department of Human Welfare, School of Humanities and Social Science seeks to nurture researchers who have basic and systematic research skills in social welfare. It also aims to turn out specialists and leaders who have a high level of expertise in various fields of social welfare. Based on the themes of humanity, Buddhism, and welfare, our education gives students a deep knowledge of the theory and practice of social welfare.
To this end, we confer a master’s degree in Human Welfare upon students who have acquired the following four abilities and qualities by the end of their studies in the two-year Master’s Course.

  • (1) Basic and systematic research skills
    Students will have gained basic and systematic research skills while deepening their understanding of self-reliance and coexistence from a Buddhist perspective.
  • (2) High level of expertise
    Students will have gained a high level of expertise in various fields of social welfare.
  • (3) Leadership ability
    Students will be able to assume a leadership role and supervise subordinates in practicing social welfare.
  • (4) Writing a master’s thesis
    Students will have acquired the prescribed credits, will have written a master’s thesis under expert guidance, and will have passed the thesis review and final exam.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The fundamental thinking behind the curriculum of the Master’s Course in the Department of Human Welfare, School of Humanities and Social Science is to develops students’ advanced knowledge in the theory and practice of social welfare. The goal is to nurture researchers who have basic and systematic research skills in social welfare. It also aims to turn out specialists and leaders who have a high level of expertise in various fields of social welfare.
The curriculum comprises the three fields of Basic Theory, Policies/Systems/Services, and Social Work. Each field involves its own specialized lectures, seminars, and research.

  • (1) Class subjects comprise specialized lectures, seminars, and research.
  • (2) At the start of the first year, each student is assigned a chief supervisor and a sub-advisor. Students take eight specialized seminar credits under their chief supervisor and four specialized seminar credits under their sub-advisor. Students also select classes according to their research theme.
  • (3) Writing a master’s thesis
    In the first year, students learn basic research methodology by conducting research in preparation for a master’s thesis.
    In the second year, students proceed with research on a self-designated research theme, in the process gaining the skills needed to write a master’s thesis.
  • (4) For adult students, a review of their research results on a specific topic can take the place of a master’s thesis.
Education Method

In specialized lectures, the instructor in charge conducts lectures on their area of research. In specialized seminars, which are linked to specialized lectures, instruction is given to students—in line with each student’s research theme—with full consideration given to the following items in the following three fields.

  • (1) The Basic Theory field covers the social and historical significance and roles of social welfare.
  • (2) The Policies/Systems/Services field covers research into the systems and policies of social welfare, comparative studies of social welfare policies around the world, and the development of community medicine, healthcare, and welfare outreach.
  • (3) The Social Work field covers practical social welfare techniques as direct and indirect ways to respond to social needs.

In specialized research, lectures are given on literature, legal cases (precedents), and investigative methods related to each student’s research theme. Classes also include presentations and discussions by the students.

Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) For lectures, students are evaluated on their class participation, conduct, and written papers.
  • (2) For seminars, students are evaluated on their research presentation and on how they respond to others’ presentations.
  • (3) For the master’s thesis, the chief supervisor and sub-advisor review the thesis. Students are also evaluated on their performance in an oral exam.
Admission Policy

The Master’s Course, Department of Human Welfare, School of Humanities and Social Sciences admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the graduate school’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  1. 1. Those who respect others.
    In today’s world where many people isolate themselves, we want students who follow the spirit of Buddhism, which is one of the founding principles of IBU. We want people who seek to know themselves and who respect others.
  2. 2. Those who are eager to do research.
    We want students who are eager to learn and who will conduct their studies by using their knowledge in the foundations of social welfare, their comprehensive academic background, and their abilities to carry out theoretical and practical research.
  3. 3. Those who are enthusiastic about raising the level of social welfare.
    Society is changing at breakneck speed—aging populations and advancing globalization are just two examples—and our ability to ensure the welfare of citizens is facing increasingly diverse challenges. To meet the growing need for deeper research into the many aspects of social welfare, we seek students with a passion for improving how society helps those in need.

Doctoral Course—Three Years

Students deepen their research in order to become researchers or experts who are highly capable and knowledgeable.

  • 1. Development of researchers who have advanced research capabilities.
  • 2. Development of professionals (leaders in welfare) with high levels of expertise and practical skills.
  • 3. Preparation of doctoral theses.

Students who complete the Doctoral Course (three years) and pass the thesis review are given a Ph.D. in Human Welfare.

Diploma Policy

The Doctoral Course in the Department of Human Welfare, School of Humanities and Social Science seeks to nurture educators and researchers who have the deep insight and knowledge needed to structure an academic system in social welfare. It also aims to turn out specialized personnel who have a high level of research and leadership skills. Education is based on the themes of humanity, Buddhism, and welfare. This education adds depth to the research that students conduct under expert guidance in the Master’s Course. It also develops students’ ability to tackle research on their own initiative and on an ongoing basis, as specialized researchers in social welfare.
To this end, we confer a doctorate in Human Welfare on students who have acquired the following four abilities and qualities by the end of their studies in the three-year Doctoral Course:

  • (1) Deep knowledge and advanced research skills
    Students will have gained advanced research skills and a deep and broad knowledge base, while deepening their understanding of self-reliance and coexistence from a Buddhist perspective.
  • (2) High level of expertise
    Students will have gained a high level of expertise in various fields of social welfare.
  • (3) Clearly defined research theme and new knowledge
    Students will have a clearly defined research theme and the ability to bring forth new knowledge.
  • (4) Writing a doctoral thesis
    Students will have acquired the prescribed credits, will have written a doctoral thesis under expert guidance, and will have passed the thesis review and final exam.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The Doctoral Course in the Department of Human Welfare, School of Humanities and Social Science seeks to nurture educators and researchers who have the deep insight and knowledge to structure an academic system in social welfare. It also aims to turn out specialized personnel who have a high level of research and leadership skills. Education is based on the themes of humanity, Buddhism, and welfare, and it builds on the research that students conduct under expert guidance in the Master’s Course. It also develops students’ ability to tackle research on their own initiative and on an ongoing basis, as specialized researchers in social welfare.
The curriculum comprises the three fields of Basic Theory, Policies/Systems/Services, and Social Work. Each field involves specialized research and specialized seminars.

  • (1) Class subjects comprise specialized research and specialized seminars.
  • (2) At the start of the first year, each student is assigned a chief supervisor and a sub-advisor. Students take 12 specialized seminar credits under the chief supervisor. They also select classes according to their research theme.
  • (3) From the second year, students take specialized seminars under their chief supervisor.
  • (4) Students who plan on writing a doctoral thesis receive guidance aimed at completing the thesis.
Education Method

In specialized seminars, which are linked to specialized lectures, instruction is given to students—in line with each student’s research theme—with full consideration given to the following items in the following three fields.

  • (1) The Basic Theory field covers the social and historical significance and roles of social welfare.
  • (2) The Policies/Systems/Services field covers research into the systems and policies of social welfare, comparative studies of social welfare policies around the world, and the development of community medicine, healthcare, and welfare outreach.
  • (3) The Social Work field covers practical social welfare techniques, as direct and indirect ways to respond to social needs.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) For specialized research, students are evaluated based on their class participation, conduct, and written papers.
  • (2) For specialized seminars, students are evaluated on their research presentation and on how they react to others’ presentations.
  • (3) Each doctoral thesis is reviewed by a degree-granting review committee comprising at least three judges, including the chief supervisor and sub-advisor.
Admission Policy

The Doctoral Course, Department of Human Welfare, School of Humanities and Social Sciences admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the graduate school’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  1. 1. Those who respect others.
    In today’s world where many people isolate themselves, we want students who follow the spirit of Buddhism, which is one of the founding principles of IBU. We want people who seek to know themselves and who respect others.
  2. 2. Those who are eager to do research.
    We want students who are eager to take on specific areas of research and who will do so by using their systematic expertise in social welfare, their comprehensive academic background, and their ability to think analytically and logically in conducting theoretical and practical research.
  3. 3. Those who are enthusiastic about raising the level of social welfare.
    Society is changing at breakneck speed—aging populations and advancing globalization are just two examples—and our ability to ensure the welfare of citizens is facing increasingly diverse challenges. To meet the growing need for deeper research into the many aspects of social welfare, we seek students with a passion for improving how society helps those in need.
  4. 4. Those with clear and precise research themes.
    We seek students who have clear, precise ideas for their research, who can conduct it autonomously, and who can approach it from multiple perspectives.

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