Junior College

General Education Subjects

Choose from a wide range of choices regardless of your department or major.

These subjects allow you to acquire knowledge of the basics and of relevant domains needed to advance your specialized studies.

Foundations for Learning

Basic Document Preparation, Introduction to Special Needs Education, Sign Language Communication

Mind and Thought

Practical Buddhism, Introduction to Prince Shotoku, Psychology I/II, Philosophy, etc.

Society and Culture

Modern Society and Buddhism, Constitution of Japan, Law (including International Law), Political Science, Economics, etc.

Information and Natural Science

Information Processing I/II, Life Sciences, Environmental Science, Geoscience (including Physics), etc.

Health and Welfare

Sports I/II, Introduction to Social Welfare, Social Welfare Administration, Child Welfare, Welfare for the Aged, etc.

Foreign Languages

English I/II

Career Education

Career Design

Junior College Department of Child Education
Major in Life Design, Department of Life Navigation
Major in Life Care and Welfare, Department of Life Navigation

Department of Child Education

Diploma Policy

This department seeks to develop students into care providers who are trained in basic childcare skills and who are humane, compassionate, open-minded, and sympathetic. They will learn the philosophy and methodology of childcare grounded in the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku. They will be aware of the roles of a childcare provider in our modern society, where a global perspective is needed. Students will learn the basics of child development and caregiving, and they will gain the ability to practice childcare using appropriate thinking, decision-making, and skills, all while understanding the philosophy behind Buddhism-inspired childcare.
To produce individuals who can contribute to society, we specify the following three abilities and qualities that students should have acquired by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Personal qualities rooted in the university’s founding spirit
    Students will have learned the theory and practice of Buddhism-inspired childcare. They will have also undergone personal growth―mirroring the development of the children they work with―while practicing childcare with compassion, open-mindedness, and sympathy.
  • (2) A well-rounded education, practical knowledge, and specialized skills required as a childcare provider
    Students will have an interest in the social conditions concerning children and childcare. While being eager to improve their caregiving skills and gain new knowledge, students will understand issues in childcare, early education, welfare, child development, and child-rearing. Students will have acquired the basic skills needed for leading children in play and expressive activities. They will have also learned appropriate methods of expression and assistance needed in the field.
  • (3) Self-expression, communication skills, and the ability to solve problems
    Students will be able to make the right decisions concerning on-site issues and use their communication skills fully to take a flexible approach to various situations. They will also be able to reflect on their childcare practices and set new challenges for themselves.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The basic objective of the curriculum of the Department of Child Education is to have students acquire a Type 2 kindergarten teaching license or a nursery school teacher certificate. Centered on Practical Childcare I–IV, classes teach students to grasp the essence of childcare and to acquire specialized and practical skills founded on a Buddhist view of children and childcare. For this, there are six systematically categorized subject groups ranging from the basic to the applied. Specialized subjects are apportioned to each year. This allows students to acquire a solid base of knowledge and skills, and then to develop an inquisitive mind and effective problem-solving abilities. This enables them to become independent learners of practical childcare.

  • (1) Subjects on the essence and significance of childcare, the history and systems of childcare, and the role of caregivers. Subjects include Caregiver Theory, Fundamentals of Childcare, Principles of Education, and Social Welfare.
  • (2) Subjects on children’s psychological development and the basic theory of assisting families. Subjects include Psychology of Childcare, Children’s Health, and Family Assistance Theory.
  • (3) Subjects on childcare (theory and practice by area). Subjects include Introduction to Early Childhood Education and Introduction to Childcare.
  • (4) Subjects for acquiring the basic techniques and expressive skills needed in childcare. Subjects include Music, Children’s Physical Education, and Arts and Crafts.
  • (5) Extramural practicums (which include advanced and follow-up guidance) and subjects on solving problems encountered during extramural practicums.
  • (6) Subjects unique to IBU and centered on the Buddhist spirit for fostering childcare providers full of compassion. Subjects include Practical Childcare and Buddhist Childcare Theory.
Education Method
  • (1) Through case studies and the use of information and communication technology (ICT), we aim to boost students’ interest in childcare, and help them to understand specialized information and acquire the ability to identify and solve problems.
    • In classes on foundational knowledge and theory, we prioritize students’ listening and writing skills and ensure strict class discipline.
    • In classes on the application and development of theory and skills, we nurture cooperation among students through group work. We also help them polish their oral communication skills and acquire the ability to solve problems.
  • (2) Piano-playing aptitude varies greatly from person to person. That’s why we offer students basic introductory piano lessons before they join IBU. We also provide individual lessons after they enter IBU.
  • (3) We provide exchanges with students in other years and active learning opportunities at actual childcare facilities. So that students will be motivated to acquire the skills and to foster the compassion needed to be a childcare provider, the Department of Child Education teaching staff works as a team and encourages students’ learning.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) We take a multifaceted approach to evaluating students’ educational results. Depending on the subject, assessment may include written tests, skills tests, assignments, or papers. Students are also evaluated on their attitude toward learning, which includes basic listening and writing skills.
  • (2) Other measures of evaluation include the participation rate in group work and presentations, worksheets created by each group, and class attendance. These are required for gaining the qualities and attitude befitting a compassionate childcare provider.
  • (3) Because piano aptitude varies greatly from person to person, students are evaluated via rubrics.
  • (4) The core subjects of the Department of Child Education are Practical Childcare I–IV. Students are evaluated each semester on their portfolio, which comprises worksheets created in each class and a paper written at the end of each semester. Each student’s portfolio-based evaluation is reviewed at a departmental meeting and again at a year-end study group on training courses for childcare providers. Evaluations are shared with all department faculty.
Admission Policy

The Department of Child Education admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the college’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who have a strong interest in studying child education and child development, a deep affection for children, and a clear intention to be a child education professional (kindergarten teacher or nursery school teacher).
  • 2) Those who are willing to improve their ability to communicate and express themselves, which will form the basis of activities in which they cooperate with their peers in supporting children and their guardians in childcare.
  • 3) Those who are keen to acquire skills, such as playing the piano, that are required in childcare.
  • 4) Those who have acquired basic academic abilities (especially in Japanese language) and knowledge of music at high school while developing their intellectual interests.

Department of Life Navigation

Major in Life Design

Diploma Policy

The Major in Life Design, Department of Life Navigation seeks to develop students into businesspeople who can use their well-rounded education and expertise to play a role in global society. Embodying the school creed and the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku upon which IBU was founded, students act with sincerity, politeness, and concern for good health. With this in mind, students should have acquired the following five types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Ability to draw up their own career plan
    Students will have an interest in social issues and can boldly take on any challenge, raise their level of expertise, and acquire new qualifications. To adapt to the changes of the times, students will envision their future and plan the life and career they will pursue and in which they can apply their expertise.
  • (2) High levels of expertise
    Students will have a well-rounded education and the practical business expertise needed to play a role in global society.
  • (3) Fundamental expert knowledge and skills
    Students will have acquired fundamental expert knowledge and skills and the ability to utilize information and communication technology (ICT).
  • (4) Fundamental knowledge and strengths needed as a working member of society
    Students will have acquired the basic academic skills and strengths demanded of a working member of society.
  • (5) Personal qualities rooted in the university’s founding spirit
    Students will show a deep understanding of the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku. Having undergone personal development with a focus on wa (harmony), they will be able to contribute to society as businesspeople.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The curriculum of the Major in Life Design, Department of Life Navigation comprises the following eight fields covering various subjects. On a sound theoretical basis, we provide an active learning environment in which students can take the initiative. Included are subjects that allow students to acquire various qualifications.

  • (1) In the Business and Information field, students learn about the realities of work and the basics of working in various business environments. They also learn how to become medical administrative staff members, how to use ICT to obtain useful information, and how to build friendly relationships with other people.
  • (2) In the Food field, students study healthy dietary habits. Along with an introduction to cooking, they get hands-on experience in making sweets and bread. They also learn how to make the most of seasonal ingredients. Students study food processing, food hygiene, and how to decorate eating spaces. They also study Japanese dietary culture through dishes served at festivities.
  • (3) In the Fashion field, students acquire the basic knowledge and skills needed to create comfortable clothing. They study fabric materials, apparel design, and computer-aided pattern drawing and design. Through the activities of planning fashion items and creating clothing, students deepen their understanding of the fashion industry.
  • (4) In the Interior field, students learn the basic design concepts needed to make interior design proposals. They foster their ability to envision and design the layout of items such as furniture, window dressings, and lighting. They also learn how to translate a three-dimensional space into a two-dimensional drawing.
  • (5) In the Design field, students learn the fundamentals and theory behind the use of color. They study the effects of color on human vision and how the color and representation of objects influence people psychologically.
  • (6) In the Health and Beauty field, students study the physiology of the skin, the importance of skincare, and basic make-up skills. They also learn the basics of nails and manicures. In addition, students acquire knowledge about how to maintain a beautiful and healthy body through dietary habits, exercise, and rest. Yoga and core muscle-training lessons are also provided. Students also receive an introduction to counseling as part of a study of art therapy.
  • (7) In the Bridal field, students study the history, customs, and regional characteristics of weddings in Japan. They acquire the skills needed to work in the bridal industry. They also learn about various wedding items and create flower bouquets and the like.
  • (8) In the Tourism field, students foster basic English skills and examine Japanese tourism resources and the issues Japan needs to overcome to establish itself as a major global tourism destination. They also get hands-on experience performing traditional Japanese cultural practices, such as flower arrangement and tea ceremonies, and create and wear their own yukata kimonos.
Education Method

In the Major in Life Design, students are allowed to change their field of study each semester and draw up a study plan that fits their interests. Through many seminars, practicums, and active learning sessions, students become independent learners.

  • (1) In the Food, Fashion, Interior, Design, Health and Beauty, and Tourism fields, students learn theory in lectures and then proceed with seminars and practicums to further their understanding.
  • (2) In the Business and Information field, classes are centered on lectures, and seminars are held as needed.
  • (3) In the Bridal field, classes are centered on lectures. There are also practicums that allow participants to envision working in the bridal industry as well as classes on making wedding items.
  • (4) Lectures incorporate active learning, which makes these classes interactive.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) In evaluating students in the Business and Information field, emphasis is placed on periodic exams. Short tests and assignments are also included in the evaluation. A paper may take the place of a periodic exam.
  • (2) In evaluating students in the Food, Fashion, Interior, Health and Beauty, Bridal, and Tourism fields, emphasis is placed on class participation and submitted works. A short test or paper may take the place of a periodic exam. For lectures, emphasis may sometimes be placed on periodic exams.
  • (3) In evaluating students in the Design field, emphasis is placed on periodic exams.
Admission Policy

The Major in Life Design, Department of Life Navigation admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the college’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who aim to be businesspeople who can play a role in global society by using their well-rounded education and expertise.
  • 2) Those who are interested in envisioning their future and possible occupations as well as in searching for a suitable job as part of their planning for post-college life.
  • 3) Those who aim to acquire business knowledge related to their job and obtain qualifications.
  • 4) Those who are keen on improving their ability to communicate and take on challenges.
  • 5) Those who have acquired basic Japanese language and information processing skills in high school.

Major in Life Care and Welfare

Diploma Policy

The basic objective of the Major in Life Care and Welfare, Department of Life Navigation is to develop students into certified care workers who can provide high-quality welfare services. Students also develop basic skills needed to be working members of society. We seek to turn out individuals who can use their initiative to take on any challenge in pursuit of their goals.
With this in mind, students should have acquired the following four types of abilities and qualities by the time they graduate:

  • (1) Personal qualities rooted in the university’s founding spirit
    Students will show a deep understanding of the Buddhist spirit of Prince Shotoku upon which IBU was founded. They will respect the spirit of wa (harmony) and will strive for personal growth through their interactions with others.
  • (2) Comprehensive knowledge and skills
    Students will show a deep understanding towards the recipients of nursing care. They will have also acquired the specialized knowledge and skills needed to respond with a global perspective to various care demands and related systems and services.
  • (3) High level of expertise
    Students will have acquired the practical abilities to provide care for individuals, treating them ethically and with dignity, while following appropriate care procedures.
  • (4) Problem-solving skills
    Students will have an interest in what goes on in the world and will be able to take a comprehensive view of the care recipient’s lifestyle.
Curriculum Policy
Curriculum and Course Content

The basic objective of the curriculum of the Major in Life Care and Welfare is to have students acquire certification as a care worker. Students are expected to understand the essence of caregiving and to acquire the expert practical skills that allow them to take a well-rounded approach towards care recipients (from a physical, psychological, and social aspect). They also develop the basic skills needed to be working members of society. The curriculum covers the four disciplines listed below as well as a specialized subject called the Life Care Seminar, which is unique to IBU and which nurtures students into compassionate certified care workers.

  • (1) The discipline of Humans and Society includes specialized subjects (The Essence of Care, Introduction to Social Work, and Modern Society and Welfare I/II), introductory subjects (Introduction to Buddhism, and Modern Society and Human Rights), and general subjects (Information Processing I/II and Recreation Theory). Students learn about human dignity and independence, about building personal connections, and about communication, thereby deepening their understanding of the human condition. They also gain an understanding of society by studying topics such as lifestyle and welfare, social welfare systems, care insurance systems, and disabled support systems.
  • (2) In the discipline of Care, students come to know the basics of care through these subjects: Care Welfare Theory, Care Welfare I/II, Supporting the Elderly and Related Specialist Jobs, and Care Insurance Systems and Supporting the Elderly. In Communication Seminar I/II, students brush up their communication skills. In Daily Social Work I/II, Clothing Support, Dietary Support, Housing Support, Activity Care, and Terminal Care, students gain social work skills. In Introduction to Care Procedures and Care Procedures I/II/III/IV, students learn the procedures of care. Lastly, in Care Practice I/II/III, Case Studies, and extramural care practice, students gain an overall understanding of care and practical skills by applying what they have learned.
  • (3) In the discipline of Body and Mind, students grasp the fundamentals of human growth and development through the following subjects: Introduction to Medicine (Geriatrics) and Lifestyles of the Elderly. They also deepen their understanding of dementia through Introduction to Medicine (Dementia) and Care and Support for Dementia Patients. In Introduction to Medicine (Disabilities) and Lifestyles of the Disabled, students deepen their understanding of disabilities. Lastly, in Bodily Structures and Functions, and Mechanism of the Body and Mind I/II/III, students gain an understanding of the workings of the body and mind of care recipients.
  • (4) In the discipline of Medical Care, students acquire the basic skills for performing sputum suction and tube feeding, based on an understanding of the care recipient’s physical, psychological, and social condition.
  • (5) In the Life Care Seminar, students gain an even more comprehensive understanding of the specialized areas of practicing care, going beyond the boundaries of the four aforementioned disciplines.
Education Method

The active use of information and communication technology (ICT) and classes incorporating active learning heighten students’ interest in their studies.

  • (1) In lectures, students are exposed to the theoretical aspects of welfare systems and services. In seminars and practicums, students acquire techniques for giving assistance in daily life situations. They learn through group work and through role playing activities in which they experience being a caregiver and a care recipient. They also learn cooking techniques in cooking classes.
  • (2) In learning through exchanges, students hear talks from and interact with care recipients (such as disabled people and elderly people with dementia), managers of welfare facilities, and employees of welfare facilities (IBU graduates). This gives students a fuller understanding of care recipients and the role of caregivers, and allows them to clearly envision a future for themselves in the profession.
  • (3) In extramural practicums and extracurricular studies, students go to welfare facilities to practice caregiving, based on a learning program in which they have set their own objectives. They deepen their education by gathering what they have learned, presenting it in class, and holding discussions. Students also learn about general trends in welfare and welfare equipment by visiting or participating in welfare equipment tradeshows.
Evaluation of Educational Results
  • (1) Evaluation via written tests.
    Students are evaluated on their level of theoretical understanding.
  • (2) Evaluation via reports.
    Students write reports on their hands-on experiences, exchanges, lectures, and visits. Students are evaluated on whether their reports are written in line with their self-designated theme, whether they cover important concepts, and whether they use the appropriate terminology.
  • (3) Evaluation via skills tests and pieces of work.
    Students’ attained skill levels are evaluated based on a checklist of procedures. They are also evaluated on the completeness of the work assigned.
  • (4) Evaluation via extramural practicums.
    Students are given an overall evaluation based on a self-evaluation and on evaluations from the facility instructor and IBU instructor. These are done based on a designated evaluation form.
Admission Policy

The Major in Life Care and Welfare, Department of Life Navigation admits students who have the following abilities, qualities, and sense of purpose as conditions for receiving education designated in the college’s Diploma Policy and Curriculum Policy:

  • 1) Those who have an interest in the affairs and events of society and who like to interact and work with people.
  • 2) Those who have acquired basic academic abilities centered on Japanese language skills (reading, writing, listening, comprehension) in high school.
  • 3) Those who are well aware of the importance of basic daily habits such as eating properly and getting enough sleep and who take care of their health.
  • 4) Those who have worked hard with their peers in volunteer activities, extracurricular clubs, school events, and the like.
  • 5) Those who take the initiative in communication by proactively greeting others and listening to what people have to say.

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